It seems that more and more often organisations are competing on price. We live in such a price dominated world. We are bombarded by prices every day. From the Petrol station price boards to the jingles “Down, down prices are down”. Our continual exposure to this price war mentality has a big influence on us especially when it comes to the pricing of our our services and goods.
creating unforgettable products and service through innovation and awesome ideas
If we have competition we tend to think that what we should be doing is lowering our prices. While we can almost always find a way to lower our costs of production or service expenditure in the long term we just run out of features, elements and activities that we can cut or reduce. In the end our final service or product quality falls and so too does our success.
So if price cutting is not the key to long term commercial success, then what is?
I’ve been discovering how many organisations can still provide a premium product or premium service without having to enter into a price war. The insight lies in the expectations of the customer and the degree of memorability of the product or service experience.
Let’s use an accounting firm as an example. A client needs some accounting completed on time and on budget. The accounting firm completes the work on time and on budget yet nothing more. Although have met the clients expectations and created a transaction, because the have merely fulfilled the clients expectations and nothing more, to them the experience is forgettable.
Imagine now that client calls back and asks for some special reporting to be completed for an urgent report for the board of directors. The time frame is beyond the expectations of a normal delivery time, yet the accountants manage to complete the task with aplomb. The client has experienced a positive interaction and they will remember that for the future.
Creating unforgettable products and service through innovation
Consider however what would happen if the accounting firm, did a little digging and found out that their key client contact was looking to buy a new house. They brainstormed some ideas and purchased an inexpensive but best selling book on purchasing property tips and they compiled a list of trusted mortgage brokers they knew of.
They packaged it up in a nice box and called it the ‘home hunting toolbox’ and delivered it to the key client contact. Needless to say the client contact wasn’t expecting this at all, and was flummoxed as to how they even knew out their house hunting. By tapping into their imagination the accountants provided an unexpected and unforgettable experience that will help to make their client a raving fan.
While the actions and activities went beyond the expected service delivery, it was low cost and easy enough that it didn’t impact on their profit margins. What’s more important is that by continually looking at delivering unforgettable unexpected experiences for their clients, they are able to charge more than their competitors. Imagination in action is what commercial innovation is all about.
Keep those great ideas coming.

Cheers,

Nils Vesk
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If you’re anything like me and find that at the end of the day you’ve got so much going through your mind you’re wondering how you’ll ever get to sleep then this technique is a must have.

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You may be familiar with the concept of mind mapping. A term coined by the memory expert Tony Buzan. Mind mapping is a great way of discovering relationships between concepts. It allows the mind to physically see how concepts are or could be related and subsequently allow us to see new relationships and new ideas. It also funnily enough can enable us to get to sleep. It works by helping the mind capture all that is going through the mind without having to go into all the details. It’s kind of like allowing the mind to switch off now that it’s clear about what it can do tomorrow.

Innovation Blueprint, Nils Vesk, Ideas with legs, motivation speaker, innovation speaker, ideation, manager, inspiring quotes, top tips, how to, where is, what is

You can use mind mapping not only at the end of the day, but whenever you are struggling with understanding the big picture and how everything fits together.

It’s a good planning tool before starting a project. I also use it for research, capturing the key concepts as I discover new information.

Next time you’re finding it difficult to sleep or simply have a lot of stuff going on in your mind, start mind mapping and you’ll discover some nice clarity and peace!

Keep those great ideas coming.

Cheers,

Nils

Have you ever noticed when you’re on holidays that big ideas just seem to come to you? The problem is, you want to relax and not think about work so you don’t bother doing anything about them and before you know it the great idea has gone up in smoke.

‘Vacation thinking’ is about understanding the need for taking breaks from thinking about your ideas. It’s also about being prepared for capturing the ideas that come when we least expect them. My good friend, Dr Craig, is a mad hang gliding buddy of mine who seems to know the value of ‘leave it’ in the creative process.

Picture the following: we’re flying 4000 feet in the air in a hang gliding competition. I can see Craig in the distance and, as usual, I’m trying to catch up to him. All of a sudden I see him wobble from side to side.

Holiday Season innovation on ideas

Finally, after what seems an eternity, I see Craig straightening up the glider and hear his voice, ‘Nils copy Craig.’ Scared, I ask him what was wrong: ‘Was it some bad air? Was it the glider?’ His response scares me even more. ‘I made a phone call.’

Later, safely back on the ground Craig, who’s a surgeon, elaborates. It seems that he had a host of operations booked in for the following day and while flying high in the sky had a brain wave for one of the operations that he immediately needed to share with a colleague! Now, while you may not share Dr Craig’s daring or, depending on how you look at it, ‘death wish’, attitude and use a phone while dangling in a fragile contraption high above the earth, I’m sure you can see the value in using a phone to capture your vacation revelation.

Holiday season innovation ideas

The mobile phone is simply the world’s best personal idea-capturing device. I reckon I get more messages from myself than anyone else at times. I simply call myself and tell myself the idea. I can then work on it later when I’m back at my workplace. The important thing is that you capture it immediately and work on it later. No need for getting into overtime mentality, simply capture it in 10 seconds and get back to enjoying your vacation.

So for these upcoming holidays, enjoy your break yet capture those good ideas (there will be more of them than you can imagine).

If you want to really kick start innovation in 2014 we have just a couple of places left in our 12 month Innovation Blueprint Program. For more info just shoot us an email or give us a call on 1300 139 272 to find out more.

Happy Holidays from all of us at Innovation Blueprint and we look forward to sharing our innovation insights in 2014.

Interested in more innovation support? Check out the world’s first 12 month Commercial Innovation Program. Don’t hesitate to call us at the studio for more information on 1300 139 272 or email us at support@InnovationBlueprint.com.au.

Good Luck to your ideas and have a happy holiday!

Here’s to your big ideas!

Nils

 

Article sourced via: How to Innovate in the Holidays

 

In a post Web 2.0 world, communication has to be re-invented which brings a huge opportunity to individuals, organizations or brands: content curation. While the history of communication until the end of the previous century has only been focusing on enlarging the distribution to a few published or broadcasted content creators, we now live in information overload where content curators can be the new super heroes.

Why conten curation is a new form of communication? Check out the neat presentation provided to us from SCOOP.IT

These are the slides of a talk Guillaume gave at the University of San Francisco on Sept. 17, 2013.

Content is King, Curation is the new Fav, Content Curation Is Now The Basic In Communication, Scoop it, Pinterest, Facebook, WordPress, Twitter, Linkedin, Innovation Blueprint, Education, Nils Vesk, History of Communication, Writing an Article, How to, Top tips, What is, Where is, Which is, Famous, Innovation Blog, Innovative Ideas, Ideas with Legs, Sydney, Australia, Keynote, Innovation Speaker, Latest News, Current Update, Keynote Speaker Service, Best Speaker in Town, Blueprint, Huge Client List, Connect with your Ideas, Something worth discovering, Ideation process, Best man on the job, Picture Trigger, Innovation Blog, Inspiring people, Collaroy NSW, Innovation Update, the science in innovation, Light up your idea, idea blueprint, discover limitless ideas on innovation, generate ideas and awesome thingsContent Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 2 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 3 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 4 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 5 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 6 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 7 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 8 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 9 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 10 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 11 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 12 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 13 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 14 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 15 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 16 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 17 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 18 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 19 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 20 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 21 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 22 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 23 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 24 Content Curation Is Now The King. Find Out Why. Image 25

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nils on curation of content

Guillaume Decugis, Content is King, Curation is the new Fav, Content Curation Is Now The Basic In Communication, Scoop it, Pinterest, Facebook, WordPress, Twitter, Linkedin, Innovation Blueprint, Education, History of Communication, Writing an Article, How to, Top tips, What is, Where is, Which is, Famous, Innovation Blog, Innovative Ideas, Ideas with Legs, Sydney, Australia, Keynote, Innovation Speaker, Latest News, Current UpdateGuillaume Decugis’s insight:These are the slides of a talk I gave at the University of San Francisco last month on how content curation is a needed new form of communication in a post Web 2.0 information overloaded Web.

 

Article sourced via: Scoop.it on Why Content Curation Is A New Form Of Communication

Organisations that have innovation as a key element of their vision and values piece can finally turn the value into a reality through some simple innovation techniques.It’s a sad fact that while roughly 90% of most organisations say that ‘Innovation’ is one of their core values, only around 2% will have an Innovation structure and only around 4% will have had any basic Innovation training which means the value seldom becomes a reality. Innovation Blueprint, Ideas with Legs, Nils Vesk, Sydney, Australia, Trending, Innovate, Pinterest, Facebook, Youtube, Latest, Current, Update, News

Taking innovation off the value chart on the wall to the floor isn’t as hard as people think, it can be done by simply modifying the way we run team meetings. Organisations usually don’t understand what innovation actually is and the behaviours and techniques to achieve innovation.

We see there’s an increase in the number of organisations who espouse innovation yet fail to support the value, which leads to frustrated employees and lost commercial opportunities.

For example we recently worked with an organisation who had a leadership team demanding more innovation yet refusing to give permission, time or training to kick start the process. It was like asking someone who’s never played piano to become a professional pianist overnight.

But the leadership team now understand that innovation is like any other business skill that has to be learned and applied in order to yield results. After a short period of training, having a simple quick innovation procedure to follow and incorporating these into their regular team meetings, the innovations have been making an obvious commercial impact.

Organisations with a wall based innovation value could bring it to life by doing the following:

  • Innovation Rituals: Innovative Cultures are made up of innovative rituals. Create some rituals that encourage the creation of fresh ideas. For example having a weekly guest.
  • Speaker or sharing and unpacking a successful new product or service from outside of the industry.
  • Permission to spend time to innovate: Innovation takes time. While it doesn’t have to grind productivity to a halt you need some time if you want to innovate. Start by adding on an extra 30 mins to a meeting once a week.Innovation Blueprint, Ideas with Legs, Nils Vesk, Sydney, Australia, Trending, Innovate, Pinterest, Facebook, Youtube, Latest, Current, Update, News
  • Innovation needs to be consistent: Everyday presents an opportunity to innovate. Diarise innovation activities, be they at monthly meetings or weekly sessions.
  • Innovation skills need to be learnt: While everyone has the capability to be innovative, too few of us have the skill to apply innovation. Learning effective, simple and replicable innovation skills is a must.
  • Innovation needs to be recognised: Catching a good thing happening boosts culture, and a simple way to do this is to create a monthly award for the most improved innovator – this means everyone can always improve and aspire to.

Our great inspiring colleague Organisational culture expert Michael Henderson agrees with our approach.  “Culturing is fundamental to bringing the innovation value to life. London economist Mike West has established that culture is eight times more important than strategy, so if it’s innovation you’re after you need to get the culture right by creating Innovative project opportunities, Innovative leaders worth following and a culture worth belonging to.”

I hope this helps you to get that value off the wall and into action. If you’re interested in finding out more ways to apply innovation to your organisation you can find out more at our free half day upcoming Commercial Innovation Summit on the 29th October 2013 in Sydney. We only have 5 place left. For more information click the image below or the link here:  Commercial Innovation Summit

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Here’s to your big ideas!

Nils

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My innovation book “Ideas with Legs” paperback is selling like hotcakes to organisations, I know more people are looking for an eBook version for their kindle, ipad etc. So we’ve responded and is now available on your favorite ebook downloaders. Hurry! check it out now.Ideas with Legs, Innovation Blueprint, Nils Vesk, ebook, youtube, pinterest, wordpress, facebook, current update, latest trending news, innovative
Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here or the image of the book to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs.
Cheers,
Nils
Innovation architect (p)1300 139 272

So we all heard about this awesome ‘I QUIT’ video presentation created from this awesome and innovative girl for his boss… or should I say former boss.

…now ‘I QUIT’ girl in the video lands a job offer

Viral “I Quit” video star Marina Shifrin is already being recruited. On Thursday, just five days after her interpretive-dance YouTube resignation, set to Kanye West’s “Gone,” made her a working-woman’s hero, Shifrin appeared as a guest on the Queen Latifah Show, saying she had no regrets. “Sometimes I think that you need to forcefully close one door in order for another one to open a little easier,” the former video producer for Next Media Animation told Latifah.

The talk show host then shocked her guest by offering her a job. “With your experience, maybe I could create a position. What if I created something called ‘digital content producer,’” she said on her show on Wednesday, grinning a bit like the Cheshire cat. “You think that might be something you’d be interested in?

Shifrin, who is also a writer and photographer, looked stunned. “Are you doing a standup joke right now? I mean…”

“I’m a humorous person but you’re the standup. I’m a boss! And bosses can hire!”

Viewers had to wait until Friday to find out Shifrin’s answer. On Thursday, a show representative told Yahoo Shine that Shifrin was still “meeting with the show producers and staff to discuss the opportunity further” and had not yet made a final decision.

Shifrin’s video, “An Interpretive Dance for My Boss Set to Kanye West’s Gone,” has been viewed more than 11 million times and has spawned at least one knockoff, by work-at-home mom Brenna Jennings.

Shifrin is not the first person whose viral-video fame has led to great opportunity: A secretly filmed bus-stop dancer landed an onstage role as a result of her moves, while one-handed basketball master and high-school student Zach Hodskins got offered a roster spot on the University of Florida team after recruiters saw the highly viewed video of him dribbling and shooting like a pro.

Given Shifrin’s appreciation of rap music, and the fact that Latifah is basically the first lady of the genre—along with the women’s shared ability to light up onscreen, stir up controversy and make people laugh—it’s pretty clear that they’ll make a fine pair. Say yes, girl!

 

Article source via: http://shine.yahoo.com/work-money/i-quit-girl-lands-job-offer-165556646.html

 

 

It’s a sad fact that while so many of us possess innovative skills and talent (yes you already are innovative), the organisations that we work with seem to have systems, processes and even people that do their best to suppress innovation.

Unless we have the good fortune to work for a start up organisation, it’s most likely that our organisation has a performance mindset and a risk averse approach to doing business. While it makes sense to improve performance and minimise risk, if we do it without allowing innovation our competitors are going to sail on past us to conquer the new territories and markets of the world.
Innovation is essential in any organisation and what we need to do is ensure that improving the performance of what we are already doing doesn’t get in the way of new innovative activities that we could be doing to create new opportunities that exceed our existing performance and returns.
The top 20 key suppressors to innovation in an organisation are 
  • Only looking for fine tuning improvements such as efficiencies.
  • Believing that the existing product or service currently delivered is the only focus of opportunity.
  • Not allowing time for new product or service ideas.
  • Refusing to be leading edge with a new market idea.tackling innovation suppresion, innovation update, newsletter about innovation, monster suppression, ideas, innovation blueprint australia, keynote speaker the best speech coach
  • Not allowing rapid small prototyping of ideas.
  • Shooting ideas down before they can be explained in the idea generation (ideation) stage.
  • Looking for group consensus (democratic vote) without proper explanation of the ideas potential and background.
  • Over-complicated submission procedures to initiate new projects/ ideas such as having to go to numerous committees or approval groups to even start developing an idea concept.
  • Not having a time-sheet code for innovation (for organisations that insist on using time sheets).
  • Not providing innovation skills training.
  • Silo teams that have no cross collaboration.
  • Leaders/ Managers who do not want to or know how to recognise innovation.
  • An organisational culture that do not encourage everyday innovative rituals.
  • Allowing fault finding mindsets to dominate a group without  allowing opportunity mindsets in the room.
  • An organisation that limit access to clients/ customers and therefore prevent understanding user and customer needs, expectations etc.
  • Discarding the importance of inventions, products or service from unrelated industries.
  • Preventing people who were involved in the idea generation phase to be involved in the development and execution of an idea.
  • Creating isolated innovation teams that work in isolation and do not involve the rest of the organisation except in execution.
  • Having a non transparent idea approval process.
  • Not allowing teams to have fun in their work.
20 Simple strategies to tackle innovation suppression in an organisation 
  • Looking for new service/ product offerings that add value to users/ customers.
  • Encouraging vigorous interrogation/ challenging of existing processes/ products and core services by asking, what would we need to do if we couldn’t do this core service/ product any more? What would we need to do to survive?
  • Allowing time for new product or service idea generation
  • Choosing to be leading edge with a new market idea, but minimising risk by using small test markets and rapidly improving on each prototype innovation
  • Allowing rapid  prototyping of ideas on a small scale to test the potential without excess expenditure.
  • Allow only positive contributions to ideas generated during the idea generation (ideation) stage and having a separate selection and interrogation of ideas as a separate process held at a later date.
  • Only use group consensus approval (democratic vote) on ideas after there’s been a thorough explanation of the user/ customer needs/ desires information and an outline of ideas potential and relevant challenges.
  • Having a one page submission procedure to initiate new projects/ ideas where a budget is needed to initiate the project and allow a time frame to develop a conceptual prototype of the idea for communication purposes.
  • Having a time-sheet code for innovation (for organisations that insist on using time sheets).
  • Provide innovation skills training.
  • Ensure cross team/ section collaboration.
  • Encourage Leaders/ Managers do have monthly ‘most improved innovator’ awards (to encourage continual innovation across the board)
  • Create everyday innovative rituals that form the innovation culture of the organisation. For example allowing some blue sky thinking at a weekly meeting or having a weekly idea exchange between different departments etc.
  • Encourage team members to look for at least 2 things they like about an idea and its potential before moving to faults.
  • Encourage and allow access to clients/ customers further improve the understanding of user and customer needs, expectations etc.
  • Structure conversations and research into inventions, products or service from unrelated industries top consider the learning and how to apply to your organisation
  • Allow people who were involved in the idea generation stage to be involved in the development and execution of an idea.
  • Create innovative teams across the organisation by providing innovation tools and skills training to equip all teams in commercial innovation
  • Have a transparent idea approval process.
  • Encourage teams to have fun- humour stimulates creativity and innovation not to mention it improves performance and culture.
I really hope you make the time to execute on some of the simple strategies to tackle innovation suppression in your organisation. If you do, it can only lead to helping you become a world class innovator.

The passenger pigeon, the dodo and the woolly mammoth are just a few of the species wiped off the Earth by changing environments and human activities.

Now, advances in biotechnology could enable scientists to bring extinct animals back from the grave. But critics argue the practice would only hinder conservation efforts, by resurrecting creatures that could not survive in the wild. Reviving the Mammoth | Innovation Blueprint

First popularized by Michael Crichton’s novel “Jurassic Park,” the process of de-extinction has become more than a sci-fi concept. In 2003, biologists brought back a Pyrenean ibex by making a clone of frozen tissues harvested from the last of these goats. The clone died within minutes of its birth due to a lung deformity, but the experiment proved de-extinction was possible. [6 Extinct Animals That Could Be Brought Back to Life]

“We can use some of these techniques to actually help endangered species improve their long-term viability,” said ecologist Stanley Temple of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Where it gets controversial is when we start talking about species that have been extinct for a very long period of time,” Temple said.

Reviving the passenger pigeon

The passenger pigeon filled the skies of North America in flocks of millions during the 19th century. But hunting and habitat destruction steered the birds to extinction. The world’s last passenger pigeon, Martha, died in 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoo in Ohio.

But what if scientists could bring them back? Writer and environmentalist Stewart Brand, founder of the Whole Earth Catalog, and his wife Ryan Phelan, founder of the genetics company DNA Direct, wondered if it were possible. Working with Harvard biologist George Church, they figured out a possible way to revive passenger pigeons.

You can’t simply clone a passenger pigeon museum specimen, because they no longer have fully intact genomes. But there could be another way: Using fragments of the passenger pigeon DNA, scientists could synthesize the genes for certain traits and splice the genes together into the genome of a rock pigeon.

The cells containing the passenger pigeon DNA could be transformed into cells that produce eggs and sperm, which could be injected into rock pigeon eggs. The pigeons that hatched would be rock pigeons, but their offspring would resemble passenger pigeons. Scientists could then breed these birds and select for specific traits, as a dog breeder might. Eventually the resulting offspring would appear very much like the passenger pigeon.

But that’s not the only extinct animal scientists have their sights on reviving.

Woolly mammoths next?

Other scientists dream of bringing back a beast that roamed the Earth hundreds of thousands of years ago: the woolly mammoth. Well-preserved mammoths have been dug out of the Siberian tundra containing bone marrow, skin, hair and fat. If a living mammoth cell were found, it could be grown in a lab and coaxed to form an embryo. The embryo could be implanted into the closest living relative of mammoths, an elephant, which would give birth to a baby mammoth.

Finding a living mammoth cell is very unlikely. But South Korean biomedical engineer Insung Hwang hopes to find just a cell nucleus and produce a clone from it, like Dolly the sheep. The nucleus would be implanted into an elephant egg whose nucleus had been removed. But this is no easy feat — no one has yet successfully harvested an elephant egg.

The challenges aren’t trifling. Even if researchers succeed in creating a mammoth, passenger pigeon or other extinct creature, it has to survive in the wild. This means having the right food and habitat, and evading predators — especially humans.

Conservation controversy

Critics of de-extinction say reviving extinct animals would do more harm to conservation efforts than good.

“I don’t think it has any merit at all,” said conservation ecologist Stuart Pimm of Duke University, N.C. “It totally ignores the very practical realities of what conservation is about.”

The prospect of bringing species back from extinction would lead Congress to support the destruction of natural habitats, because animals that go extinct could be revived in a lab, Pimm told LiveScience.

Most species are going extinct in tropical forests, Pimm said. Saving a species through de-extinction when humans are burning forests and destroying native communities is a joke, he said.

Biologist David Ehrenfeld of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, agrees de-extinction would impede conservation. “It’s very negative, very expensive and not going to achieve any conservation goal as far as I can see,” Ehrenfeld said.

For example, the passenger pigeon was a very social bird known to form flocks of millions. When their numbers dwindled to a few thousand, the birds stopped breeding, Ehrenfeld told LiveScience. De-extinction methods would produce just a handful of birds, so “who’s to say they would reproduce?” he said.

What’s more, the pigeons that raised them would be a different species, with differing mothering techniques. “The environment is different in every respect,” Ehrenfeld said.

Temple took a more moderate view. “If we’re going to try to do this seriously, it’s probably in everyone’s best interest that the early attempts have a high probability of success,” he said.

Resurrecting a creature like the passenger pigeon or woolly mammoth has a strong appeal to the public’s imagination, Temple said. “But the species that are often hyped don’t meet those criteria at all,” he said.

Article source via: http://news.yahoo.com/incredible-technology-bring-extinct-animals-back-life-154944075.html

Some interesting innovation that never got the chance to prove itself!

Innovation Crunch

It’s not hard to agree on the fact that certain inventions have changed our world irreversibly is it? The telephone, the automobile, the computer. We could go on and on. What about the inventions that COULD have likely changed the world, but found themselves without financing? This list may read like a science fiction novel at points, but think of how each could have effected the different areas of our lives. Enjoy our look at 7 weird inventions that never got financed.

Weir Inventions

Tesla’s Wireless Energy – It’s hard to have a discussion about off the wall inventions without the name Nikola Tesla quickly coming up. One of his most brilliant plans was a device which could transfer energy over vast distances – including electrical energy – without cables or wires. He began work on this project with the help of several wealthy backers. That is until they saw it could…

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While being intentional about our innovation is sure to bring results. You might be suprised at the number of commercial innovative ideas that come by accident.

Some classic examples of accidental innovation include:Image

  • Penicillin
  • Corn Flakes
  • Synthetic dye and the colour mauve
  • Potato chips
  • Vulcanised rubber
  • The pacemaker
  • The microwave
  • Teflon
  • Safety Glass

Here’s when and how accidental innovation is likely to happen:

  • Accidental combinations
  • Accidental substitutions
  • Accidental omissions
  • Accidental reductions
  • Quantity variation
  • Incorrect application of instructions
  • Dropping, fumbling, breaking physical elements

While the accident component is what usually enables the magic to happen, the first part for most of these accidental innovations started with some form of experimentation.

It’s the flaky dough that Keith Kellogg left standing too long but decided to bake it anyway that led to cornflakes being born. And it’s Charles Goodyear spilling rubber, sulphur and lead onto a stove to create vulcanised rubber.

Accidents happen, and with the right mindset allowing a few accidents may just be the shortcut to a new innovation. Why not replicate some of these accidents in a controlled situation to see what commercial innovations you can create.

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My innovation book “Ideas with Legs” paperback is selling like hotcakes to organisations, I know more people are looking for an eBook version for their kindle, ipad etc. So we’ve responded and is now available on your favorite ebook downloaders. Hurry! check it out now.

IDEAS WITH LEGS | INNOVATION EBOOK

Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs. 

Cheers,
Nils
Nils Vesk
Innovation architect (p)1300 139 272

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/8/20/accidental-versus-intentional-innovation.html

 

Too many organisations in the world are guilty of Innovation suppression – the practice of actively pushing innovation opportunities out of our mind and out of focus.

The standard thinking that applies is “I don’t have the time to think about doing things differently and innovating, we’ll do that when things slow down a bit”. Sound like a familiar excuse, be it your own or someone else’s?

Innovation doesn’t have to be an optional extra that only comes out when we’ve got nothing else to do. Innovation is most powerful when we use it as a live ‘problem solving’ tool when we’re under pressure.

While it’s obvious that trying to change everything when we’re under the pump isn’t smart practice, what is smart is when we start to incorporate innovation on a micro level. Every project’s implementation plan has the opportunity for a micro innovation. What value adding activity could we incorporate, what could we remove, what will speed things up? Could we substitute a step or a material we’re using?

By starting to innovate on the micro level, we can counter the suppression of commercial innovation.

Nils Vesk
Chief Innovation Architect

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/8/8/innovation-suppression.html

Airports are full of surprises, usually the ones we don’t like such as delays, lost luggage and excessively long customs queues. I must admit I wasn’t looking forward to killing a bit of time at Tallinn Airport (the capital of Estonia) located in Eastern Europe.

The good news is I was pleasantly surprised by some of the innovations it had incorporated through its very small but effective airport. My first surprise came just after coming through the security screening on my way to the departure lounges. Just after the screening I noticed a customer service measurement tool. It wasn’t complex, it was a simple device with pictures that gave the airport user a quick way to judge their security experience. Four coloured faces with simple words to allow you to score the experience.

innovation update | Value Add | Ideas with Legs | Innovation Blueprint | Blog | Nils Vesk

A quick push of the coloured face and your service experience was measured

( Perfect  –  Pleasant  –   Unpleasant  –  Unbearable )

My next value add experience came near the departure lounge. A library reading lounge, with nice comfy seats and a great stack of books to read in three key languages, English, Estonian and Russian. Their little sign said it all.

innovation update | Value Add | Ideas with Legs | Innovation Blueprint | Blog | Nils Vesk 

“Dear Visitor! Here you can find books that help you pass time until your flight”

They encourage you take the book on your flight if you find it a thrilling one, and then return it on your return. They also encourage readers to add comments and to add books to the collection.

The third value add was the expo booth. The worlds first exhibition centre in an international airport. This is a permanent trade-fair that showcases Estonian export products and investment opportunities. Knowing how many business travellers come through the airport with a spare 30 minutes or so up their sleeve, this expo booth captures attention (as it did mine) and before you know it you’re being shown around the trade show booth by their staff. A great way of promoting key Estonian businesses, gaining contact details of potential clients/customers and providing a space for people to use their time in a valuable way.

innovation update | Value Add | Ideas with Legs | Innovation Blueprint | Blog | Nils Veskinnovation update | Value Add | Ideas with Legs | Innovation Blueprint | Blog | Nils Vesk

So how can you get commercial from all these innovations?

Obstruction is a key innovation skill that comes from considering what might users or customers dislike or even hate about your service or product.  A big dislike for a lot of travellers is the waiting. Providing a reading lounge, with books to boot is a great example of innovating around the user obstructions.

To apply to your world – list the key obstructions that your users or customers may be experiencing, and start innovating around them by thinking of the ways you can address them.

  •        Can you save people time?
  •        Can you save people effort?
  •        Can you reduce the complexity for people?
  •        Can you make things less annoying or frustrating?

Commercial innovations can always be found by innovating around the obstructions.

Keep hunting for those commercial ideas.

Til next time

______________________________________________________________________________________

My innovation book “Ideas with Legs” paperback is selling like hotcakes to organisations, I know more people are looking for an eBook version for their kindle, ipad etc. So we’ve responded and is now available on your favorite ebook downloaders. Hurry! check it out now.

IDEAS WITH LEGS | INNOVATION EBOOK

Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs.

Cheers,
Nils
Nils Vesk
Innovation architect (p)1300 139 272

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/8/5/innovation-update-value-add-innovation.html

INTRO: LEADERSHIP

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Creativity for me is a lot like hang gliding. There is both an absolute madness and absolute science to it. When you can embrace the madness while trusting the science that’s when you can utilize it to fly above your competitors as you create outstanding processes, products and services.

When times are tough, clients demand more. More from the product and more from the service. Creative thinking is the most effective way of delivering outstanding results.

Just as the analogy suggests, creative thinking requires actions that will go against your instinct and everyday behavior.

 

It’s just after you start to change your behavior that your feet leave the ground and you begin to soar. The good news is you’ve already been a creative pilot in the past. As a child you were fearless, investigative, experimental, imaginative and totally creative.

All you need to do is relearn some of the uninhibited creative behaviors in order to allow yourself to create outstanding solutions no matter what challenges you face.

 

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerDECIDE: WHERE TO BE CREATIVE

Tip:

Map it first.

Why? Because being creative without a map is a recipe for wasting time and money.

Having a map of our customer touch points, gives us orientation and the ability to apply productive creative thinking to create outstanding results.

Start by mapping the obvious activities you do each day, phone calls and email etc. Once you have created a basic map of the major touch points then you can break it down to even more detail.

MAP: EVERY DETAIL MATTERSInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Map every detail.

Here’s why: The more details you have on all your touch points you have the easier it is to do improve them.

When you’ve mapped the obvious touch points it’s time map the obscure touch points. For example, mapping the touch points of a meeting when you bump into someone on the street that you know.

What questions could you ask, how could you position yourself and your business in a way that hasn’t happened before?

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerTOUCH POINTS: CREATE NEW ONES

Tip:

Look for creating touch points that start before and after your existing touch points.

Why? Great innovations can happen by looking beyond what you think is your line of work.

Icebreaker is a clothing manufacturer for winter fleece products. They looked at their touch points and realiZed that if they could identify a touch point of where their fleece was coming from they could increase their sustainability message. They create a ?baa code’ on the garments that once entered on their website identifies the sheep and farm that the fleece comes from. http://www.icebreaker.com

IMPROVEMENT: FIX ITInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Fix it.

Here’s why: Applying constructive words to touch points can prompt great ideas.

Constructive words include:

Stop, Start, Combine, Strengthen, Reduce, Multiply, Substitute, Reverse, Speed up, Slow down, and Modify.

Try applying these words to your touch points to see what ideas you generate. What if you combined a meeting with physical activity ? a walking meeting? What if you could reduce the time taken in a meeting, how would you do it?

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerCONSTRUCTIVE: IMPROVE

Tip:

Treat it like a touch point.

Why? Whether you want to improve a product, process or service they can all be broken down into a series of touch points and then improved.

?Yakkay’ wanted to improve the humble bicycle helmet. Frankly they thought it looked daggy. So they asked themselves ?what if we could add something & modify it so it looked ?cool’?’ http://www.Yakkay.com

The result was a modified helmet with interchangeable caps that could be placed over the top of them. Funky headwear rather than a boring helmet.

CHALLENGE: CAN WE REMOVE IT?Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Challenge it.

Here’s why: A touch point or part of a product is never beyond challenge, but because we use them so often we see them permanently set in stone.

What would happen if you had to remove a touch point? What if you had no meeting at all? How would you get things done? What if you had to execute the items or actions discussed at the meeting itself?

By asking the ?Challenge it’ questions, we are forced to step off into the air and fly.
Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerCHANGE: CHANGING THE TOUCH POINTS

Tip: 

If you can’t remove a touch point ?change it’.

Why? If you’re absolutely certain that the touch point cannot be removed, what could you change it with?

For example could you change a face-to-face meeting with a teleconference? Change a boardroom meeting with a corridor meeting? Change an agenda meeting into a brainstorming meeting?

The more you look at your touch point the more you realize there are opportunities to challenge and change them to make them better.
FIGHTING: BREAK TRADITIONAL THINKINGInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

 Tip: 

Fight it.

Why? We are creatures of habit, and left to our own devices we will think and behave the same way every day. Fighting this pattern can help us to create new ideas that we would not normally have considered before.
The next time you sit down to think of a solution or generate ideas, start with a distraction to generate some unrelated thoughts.

Once you have the fresh thoughts you can force yourself to link them to your problem.

 

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerUNCONVENTIONAL: LINKING THE UNLINKABLE

 Tip:

Look around you.

Write down the first thing that catches your eye. Now write down all of the thoughts that come to you when you think of this object. For example ? the first thing I see is a lamp. My first thoughts are: metal, light, bright, dark, on, off, power, electricity, work and Thomas Edison.

Now link those thoughts to the topic area that you want ideas for. How can we make it ?lighter and brighter’? Imagine there was a famous genius in the room, what would he/she bring to the meeting? Turn everyone on before each agenda item by getting people to stand and shake.

 

VISION: NOTICE THINGS AROUND YOUInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Become a perve.

Here’s why: Great inventions, products and services exist all around you. All you need to do is look for them.

Rather than look for ideas from your competitors look for ideas from totally unrelated fields and businesses.

When you see a great product, process or service in motion ask yourself what are the attributes that make it great. The more attributes you can extract, the easier it is to think of how to apply them to your area of creativity.

 

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerCONCEPTS: BORROW AND CHANGE THEM

Tip:

Change it.

Why? Once you have established the key attributes that make an idea great all you need to do is change it to suit your application.

Dream Bank is an outstanding online savings scheme that has done just that. They liked the concept of ?Facebook’ and the concept that goal setting works best with accountability. After changing the attributes the outcome was an online savings scheme where people declare their savings goal and have a ?Facebook’ style application with friends keeping them accountable to their goal. http://www.dreambank.org

HATE: WHAT DO YOUR CLIENTS HATE?Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Clear it.

Here’s why: We might think we’re perfect, but the reality is there will always be something that our clients dislike about us. By finding them and claiming them we can then turn them to our advantage.

If a client thinks you’re too expensive how can you reduce the expense for them? Could you add more value to your offering, could you give them a discount for paying upfront? Could you provide them with ways of saving money elsewhere?

List your client’s dislikes about your work & creatively turn them to your advantage.
Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerDISLIKES: WHAT ARE THEY?

Tip:

Depressed states can lead to creative states.

Why? Sounds weird but we can sometimes be the most creative when we are slightly depressed, sad and lonely. By targeting on the things our clients dislike about us we can often be more creative than when we’re upbeat and happy.

Does your client think that?
Your service isn’t good enough?
Your follow up is terrible?
Your product looks ugly?
THINK:CONSTRUCTIVEInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Think right not wrong.

Thoughts drive feelings and behaviors. If we think it’s the end of the world, we start to feel that way and then we start to behave that way, which in turn makes us continue to think that way.

Write down your answers to the following:

Adversity- what’s the situation?
Beliefs ? what beliefs have you made up about the event?
Consequences ? what will happen as a result of these beliefs?
Dispute ? what’s false about your beliefs?
Energized ? do you feel better now?

 

IDEATION: LET GOInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Leave it.

Why? One of our most creative states is when we are in an Alpha brain wave state. The Alpha brain wave state is seldom achieved when working at our desk, it happens when we are chilled out, calm, relaxing and having fun somewhere away from the office.

When we’re at work we’re in a beta brain wave state which is very logical, rational, linear and frankly not very creative. So if you’ve been working non-stop trying to come up with the big idea, take a break, get outside, do something else and trust the idea will come.
IDEAS: CAPTURINGInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Use a mobile phone.

Why? The mind is a weak slave to good ideas and good ideas often come to us seemingly out of nowhere at unexpected times.

When an idea comes to you, even if you’re away from work, by using your phone to call your voice mail or text the idea you’ve now saved the idea.

When you’re back at work and ready to make the idea a reality, simply listen or read the message.

CONFUSION: USE ITInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Create a mental map.

Why? Our mind has so many thoughts that unless we map them, they take up valuable processing space that can stop us from moving on with making our ideas happen.

Map your thoughts by doing the following: In the centre of an A3 sheet of paper (in landscape format) write your main thoughts in the centre. Then starting at the one o’clock position draw a branching line from the centre. Write the first sub-topic on the line and then make subsequent branches radiating for this branch with the keywords for the thoughts. Google ?free mind’ for a free mental map software program.

 

CREATIVE: VISUALIZATIONInnovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

Tip:

Visualize in order to realize.

Why? Actively visualizing our finished process, service or product can only help to create a superior one.

The more time when can spend imagining what our product or service may look like, sound like, feel and taste like, the easier it is to realize it.

Spend some time imagining what it would be like if you were a customer handling or receiving your product or service. Capture any ideas that come to you when finished.

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker
CREATIVE: CONTRACT

Tip:

Create a contract

Why? Accountability gets results and by having an accountability partner who asks you how your idea is coming along will force you into action.

Create a contract declaring the top 3 ideas you want to realize and then sign your commitment to it and get your accountability partner to witness and sign it.

MAXIMIZE: RETURN OF INVESTMENT

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerTip:

Track it

Why? By knowing how our idea is progressing and the effort that has been involved we can objectively establish how much money and resources have been used and the R.O.I from the activity.

Create a spreadsheet that gives your idea a number, tracks the time, energy and resources spent.

Analyse the R.O.I during and after completion by looking at areas such as increased sales, decreased breakages, increased testimonials, repeat clients and so on. HyperSmash

___________________________________________________________________

My innovation book “Ideas with Legs” paperback is selling like hotcakes to organisations, I know more people are looking for an eBook version for their kindle, ipad etc. So we’ve responded and is now available on your favorite ebook downloaders. Hurry! check it out now.

IDEAS WITH LEGS | INNOVATION EBOOK

Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs.

Cheers,
Nils
Nils Vesk
Innovation architect (p)1300 139 272

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/6/19/ways-to-create-creative-idea.html

In this little blog I wanted to share with you a colleague of mine who really knows the power of humour. Some of you may have heard me talk about ‘humoufication’ before and the value it can bring in making the mundane more manageable and fun! Well here’s some ‘golden insights’ into the benefits of humour from a master comedian Rodney Marks.

-Nils Vesk

Humour Innovation Technique by Rodney Marks presented by Nils Vesk

 

The 31 Benefits of Bringing Humour to Business: by Rodney Marks

Humour Innovation Technique by Rodney Marks presented by Nils Vesk

 

1. It’s fun. We’re all dead a long time, especially in the afternoons.

2. It anchors your message, sometimes by sending it to the bottom of the harbour.

3. An emotional catharsis that results from laughter is better than a budget meeting tantrum.

4. The superiority/inferiority fulcrum swings both ways. Hierarchies are comedy’s natural enemy.

5. Juxtaposing incongruous ideas results in humour, insight and transferable disruption.

6. By lampooning weasel words and waffle, participants’ energy can be focused on real goals.

7. It keeps a meeting audience awake. Otherwise, your meeting may resemble a wake.

8. It humanises the organisation, populating the abstraction.

9. Better to having the bubble of bulldust pricked by a professional, than by every employee.

10. Tell a joke, make a point.Humour Innovation Technique by Rodney Marks presented by Nils Vesk

11. People remember humorous episodes – and associated messages.

12. Promoting a sense of humour means promoting different ways of thinking, creating and doing.

13. People will take you more seriously if you take yourself less seriously.

14. Entertaining the troops enhances morale and productivity. And that’s just from the comedian.

15. Humour is often the explosion of bringing disparate ideas together … good role modelling.

16. Having a comedian say what everyone is thinking clears the air, deflating unhelpful tension.

17. When people are laughing the organisation chart evaporates and the team appears.

18. Work/life balance. Humour Innovation Technique by Rodney Marks presented by Nils Vesk

19. Funny and serious are interdependent.

20. Subtle humour can show the difference between organisational power and expertise.

21. The in-house clowns may be encouraged to lift their game … or bow out gracefully.

22. It sugars the pill.

23. It stimulates conversation, breaks the ice, sets the tone – and allows clichés to be mocked.

24. It shows confidence in the resilience of your organisation and its people.

25. It makes your people memorable … in a good way.

26. It’s a happier genre than tragedy – and leads to more optimism.

27. Laughter is the best medicine. Except for penicillin.

28. It’s a tool for qualitative research … the laugh-o-meter indicates what’s truly important. Humour Innovation Technique by Rodney Marks presented by Nils Vesk

29. Even the wisest person likes a little nonsense now and then.

30. It keeps clean comedians away from stand-up comedy venues, raising the tone of both places.

31. Humour questions the status quo in an acceptable way, ventilating new ideas to open minds.

Rodney Marks,
Comedian
www.comedian.com.au
rodney@comedian.com.au

___________________________________________________________________

My innovation book “Ideas with Legs” paperback is selling like hotcakes to organisations, I know more people are looking for an eBook version for their kindle, ipad etc. So we’ve responded and is now available on your favorite ebook downloaders. Hurry! check it out now.

IDEAS WITH LEGS | INNOVATION EBOOK

Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs.

Cheers,
Nils
Nils Vesk
Innovation architect (p)1300 139 272

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/6/7/31-benifits-of-humour-to-business.html

 

When time is short, but your looking for some rapid innovation, use one of the following fail-safe innovation techniques.

ADAPT

  •  Spot an interesting invention, business or process outside of your world
  •  Identify & record the attributes (the components that make is good)
  •  Force yourself to incorporate these attributes on a process or project you have

SOLVE

  • Find a problem and define what the problem is, who and how it affects people?
  • Determine the cause of the problem
  • Identify the key attributes (parts of the problem)
  • Solve the problems part by part

INVENT

  •  If you could start what you are doing from scratch what would you differently?
  •  How can you get other people to help collaborate on the project?
  •  Think of what prototype could you create to represent the idea?
IMPROVE
  • Map the touch points/steps of what you are doing already (list them or mind map the steps)
  • Identify just one touch point to work on (insignificant ones can be good)
  • Apply one of the following promotes to the touch point. Speed up, slow down, reverse, modify, substitute, strengthen, combine
CHALLENGE
  • Identify the key touch point element of your process
  • If you had to remove the key touch point what would you need to do to survive?
  • If you really couldn’t remove it what could you substitute it with?

___________________________________________________________________

My innovation book “Ideas with Legs” paperback is selling like hotcakes to organisations, I know more people are looking for an eBook version for their kindle, ipad etc. So we’ve responded and is now available on your favorite ebook downloaders. Hurry! check it out now.

IDEAS WITH LEGS | INNOVATION EBOOK

Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs.

Cheers,
Nils
Nils Vesk
Innovation architect (p)1300 139 272

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/5/22/fail-safe-rapid-innovation-techniques.html

From tacos to tachometers, in my last rant I spoke about the Australian Mexican restaurant chain of Guzman y Gomez. The innovation skill of magnification is also in play at one of the worlds greatest car manufacturers- Volkswagen.  The VW car manufacturing plant in Dresden Germany is a classic example of ‘magnification’.

 

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerWhile every car manufacture needs to manufacture their cars somewhere, most manufacturing plants would look boringly industrial, and very unsightly. That is except for the VW manufacturing plant. VW realised that if there’s something we are doing (like manufacturing cars), there is a benefit in ‘magnifying it’.

 

The innovative result that VW came up with way back in 2002, was to build a world class manufacturing plant that looks from the outside more like the ultra modern glass building corporate headquarters of a cool company. While in reality on the inside a visitor would find a state of the art, robotic manufacturing process and automobile assembly line.

 

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerWhat VW have done in the design of their manufacturing plant is ‘magnify’ the quality of their manufacturing by enabling people to actually see and experience the manufacturing process. People are curious creatures and would love the idea of seeing how things are built. VW turn auto manufacturing plant into emotional anchoring.

When someone can see their car being built along the production line, fascination turns into emotion which in turn leads to the motication for a purchasing decision. The more the customer is involve in the process the more this leads to a brand obsession.

 

While creating a transparent manufacturing plant is not necessarily something that all businesses could do, the thinking behind it is there for the taking. Is there a part of your organisation or business that you could ‘magnify’ to reveal the quality, while increasing the experience and adding value to what you do?

 

Magnification leads to worl class innovation.

Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs.

Cheers,
Nils
Nils Vesk
Innovation architect (p)1300 139 272

 

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/5/22/magnification-revisited.html

Magnify the process to magnify the impact.

The simpler a technique is, the more effective it can be. The innovation skill of  ‘magnification’ while only being ranked as a ‘one light bulb level difficulty’ (meaning it’s a simple skill), the impact of it can be massive.

We use the innovation skill of ‘magnification’ when we are looking at creating a ‘value add’ to either our product, a process or service. Applying the ‘magnification’ skill is also about improving the user experience whether that it is for a customer, stakeholder or employee.

The business that I’d like to unpack to demonstrate this innovation skill is Guzman Y Gomez. Guzman Y Gomez is a Mexican Taqueria (Spanish for taco shop) that was set up by Steven Marks an expat American in Australia in 2006. His concept was simple – create great authentic Mexican food at a great price. To do this he would need to magnify one thing lacking in Mexican food in Australia (which was authentic flavour).

 

Burritos | Guzmanygomez | Nilsvesk | Innovation

The ‘magnification’ started to take place, by hiring chefs from Mexico to come out and teach the team how to cook more authentic tasting Mexican food. Over time, the business magnified not just the authentic Mexican taste but also magnified the authenticity to the branding and restaurant design. The result has been over 12 stores since the first conception with an estimated growth of 200% forecast in the next year as they expand across Australia.

 

 

 

 

If a Mexican restaurant can ‘magnify’ its authenticity to create remarkable success, what are you going to magnify in your world to become a world class innovator?
Feeling hungry? Check them out click here.

Magnification leads to world class innovation.

Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs.

Cheers,
Nils
Nils Vesk

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/4/22/magnification.html

A great conception leads to world class innovation

 

Today I wanted to talk about conception. Not the conception in love making but the conception of an idea and innovation. Like everything, everything starts somewhere and innovation is no different. Conception is an innovation skill that enables you to create the meaning and motivation behind an idea. If you don’t have a good reason to motivate, it’s unlikely that you will innovate.

 Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

The conception point of an innovation is a combination of a variety of factors it includes:

  • Your Motivation – the way you are doing it
  • The Function – the essence of how it will work
  • The Brief – the explanation of it all to give the big picture behind your upcoming innovation

In design thinking there is a classic saying that form follows function. Simply put your reason for creating a design is the motivation that determines the final form. While there can be some exceptions to this rule or credo, most of the time it stands true.
 Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation SpeakerA powerful example of this is the not-for-profit behaviour change company called ‘We Are What We Do‘. In 2004 their mission was to look at effecting change to  better the planet and the life of it’s occupants. Not an easy thing to do with a limited budget, and being a non for profit to boot. The solution, create  a burning mantra concept and the innovative idea will come. And yes the idea did come, in the form of a book called “Change The World For Ten Bucks” . The book had the most simple of premises. Save the planet, and doing it cheaply.

 

Did the book sell? You bet, it had sold 50,000 of them before even going to print. All because of its clear. simple, unmistakable concept. A concept so powerful and inviting that they even managed to get the Australian prime minster of the time to endorse and launch the book. The organisation is still around today staying true to their cause.

The question is what’s the clear concept you have behind your innovation? What’s been coming first? Has it been trying to focus on the ‘form’ of the innovation or the reason and motivation for innovating?

A great conception leads to world class innovation.

Nils Vesk is an innovation architect who applies the process of design thinking to the business of generating and realising ideas. Click here to find out more about his book Ideas with Legs.

Cheers,
Nils
Nils Vesk

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/4/2/conception.html

There is a direct relationship between the quality of an organisation’s ideas and their business success. 

The journey an organisation takes can vary from being painful to exhilarating. Unlike a roller coaster ride, going down in business is something that we want to avoid. There are generally 4 stages along an innovation success journey. The stages we get stuck on or progress to, are largely determined by the quality and quantity of ideas. There are also 3 basic types of businesses in regards to innovation. They are: Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

 

1. The Copycat Business

 The copycat business is the organisation that doesn’t believe in the power of innovation. They think it’s easier and cheaper to copy what the competition is doing. And yes, while copying what your competitor is doing can lead to a small amount of success, imitation is not innovation and the market place are quick to pick up that. When we stick in the copycat mindset we will forever be trying to compete on price.  Most compete on price by using a less superior product or service to achieve this. The business is far from sustainable and the future is clouded with uncertainty. This is the first stage on an innovation journey that for many will never improve.

 

2. The Pedestrian Business

 Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker

The pedestrian business at the beginning think for themselves. This 1st step of creating their own ideas rapidly brings them more success than the copycat businesses (stage 2). The pedestrian business usually starts strong with a few good ideas, but not long after (because of a lack of continuing idea generation), the number of good ideas they can choose from declines and they’re left with mediocre ideas. The resultant products, process or services become run of the mill ie. they meet a need yet don’t create raving fans. Without intervention they are often headed back into a black hole where the emphasis of the business becomes one about performance improvement (without considering continuing innovation). The performance mindset can’t help but look for tweaks in the production or service line. A cost saving here and cost saving there, and you’re back to competing on price and being a copycat business.

 

3. The Exciting Business

 The exciting business has pushed past the early glory phase of ‘runs on the board’, they understand that a successful business depends on a continuing number of fresh ideas being generated (stage 3). They realise that quantity leads to quality in their ideas. With such a large number of ideas being generated, it becomes easy to spot the brilliant ideas that the business needs (stage 4). By creating ideas, products, process and service that are so good it creates a contagious effect on the end users. Sales increase, satisfaction increases, team motivation and recognition increases and so to does the business success. The exciting business continues to innovate and therefore maintain and continually increase its margin of success.

 

Summary

 

If you want a continuing high level of business success, ensure you have a continuing idea generation program in place (to create the quantity of ideas you require), from this follow on with a clear idea selection process (to pick the best ideas in a transparent way) and finally follow on with thorough prototyping and execution.

 

I look forward to hearing about your contagious ideas!

 

Nils Vesk

Innovation architect

Innovation Blueprint – founded by Nils Vesk 

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2013/3/25/the-value-of-organisational-innovation.html

Innovation is Just A Habit

Posted: August 19, 2013 in Uncategorized

Most of us operate habitually day to day. In our organisations we follow processes, have little rituals and habits about what we think, and what we do. Not all our habits are great, many are good (they help us get where we are) and others are not so good (they stop us from growing and improving).
Our negative habits get in the way, when they prevent us from doing something more extraordinary, something more valuable or more innovative. The key part of the brain that controls our habits is the Basal Ganglia, this little piece of brain machinery is responsible allowing us to do and make so many of thousands of decisions we make everyday. In fact if it wasn’t for the Basal Ganglia, the processing power that our brains would require to process a decision from start to finish every time would be so huge that our heads would be too big to allow us to be born. The Basal Ganglia allows the brain to utilise previous experiences as a way to shortening our processing required in making decisions. In essence habits make our life easier for our brain and for ourselves.

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker
Innovation is just a series of particular habits, brought together to create some commercial magic at the end of it all. If we can create some awesome innovative habits and maintain them we can make innovating much easier.
Our challenge is:

  1.  What are the innovation habits that we want to create?
  2.  Are there any habits I need to eliminate or change that are hampering or preventing my innovation as it stands?
  3.  How do I continue my habits for a long time to come?
  4.  What is it that creates a habit in the first place?

In his awesome book the Power of Habits author Charles Duhigg, takes readers on a journey into the world of habits. After an intense investigation of Habit scientists, Duhigg reveals some of the secrets behind habits.

One key take away is that a habit is made up of:
a trigger

  • a routine
  • a reward
  • a craving

Say you start your day at the office by checking your emails as soon as you sit down.
The trigger may be seeing the computer. the routine might be to log in and check emails, the reward may be the number of emails that you look at and the craving that you are trying to satisfy may actually be trying to get a sense of control in your day to day life.
Negative habits are often continued because of the craving that it satisfies not necessarily the reward. As Duhigg shares, one of his habits was to head to the cafeteria and buy a cookie. By applying a habit awareness process, Duhigg started to capture his thoughts and feelings when this habit came on – what was he feeling? and  what was he thinking etcetera.
Part of chaining habits (if you feel they are not serving you) is in realising that we can change the reward to satisfy the craving and therefore change the habit.  Duhigg tried substituting the biscuit with some fruit. Was he craving the sweet sugar hit? The fruit didn’t satisfy him, perhaps it was something else?
 What Duhigg realised was that he was really craving the social interaction of the cafeteria. So rather than head to the cafeteria where he was likely to buy the cookie, he instead went for a wander up the corridor to see if a colleague’s door was open and have a quick chat. Craving satisfied and a new habit created.

Innovation Blog top tips | how to from Innovation Blueprint by Nils Vesk Australian Innovation Speaker
The point to this story about habits is twofold:
First go and buy the book it’s a great read and second, we need to be vigilant about bad habits that prevent us from innovating & replace them with new habits.
Here’s five quick routines or processes to start to get an innovation habit happening. Try doing one habit once a day, that way you can do 5 of them a week.

 

  1. Ask yourself if you could reinvent the way you work differently by starting from scratch.What would you do to make your work easier? – this could be making something faster, slower, simpler and so on?
  2. Scan a part of the world for something that catches your eye or your imagination – the further afield it is, the better it will be. If you’re in the world of finance explore the world romance, if you work in digital, explore the world of handcrafts. If you see am idea imagine you have to incorporate the key attributes of the idea into your world. What would that look like and how would it work?
  3. Map a part of a process that you do in your day to day work. Identify the steps that make up the process. You could think of it as a series of check lists, or a mind map of how all the elements relate to it.
  4. Look at a map of the processes you have mapped before and force yourself to improve some of the steps. Start small and stay specific, how could you improve it?
  5. What’s something that your client or team dislike about what you do in your work? What could you do to make working with your service, process or product the best experience imaginable? Now, how can you make it happen?

So what’s the craving that you’re looking for? Relieving boredom? A sense of excitement of doing something no one has done before? A challenge, a a puzzle? A sense of pride? Recognition?
Some our habits such as playing in the footy tipping competition while might be fun may not be that innovative, but it satisfies the craving of fun, and a sense of competition in a simple game with simple rules. We can do the same by creating a gaming environment around the innovation we create, with clear rules, objectives and a way of measuring ones progress with constant feedback.
Is it the number of ideas created per week? Number of new ideas or initiatives implemented in a quarter? Number of projects completed? The rules are up to you as are the opportunities.
Start your new innovation habit today.
Cheers,
Nils

Nils Vesk

Innovation Architect

Innovation Speaker

Innovation is often the essence of expansive business thinking. Here’s some thinking tips to help you in your innovation.

Step 1: DECIDE where to be innovative  
Map it first. Here’s why: Because being innovative without a map is a recipe for wasting time and money. Do you want to innovate on a process, product or service? Know what you do before you start to make it better.

Step 2: CREATE new touch points   
Look for creating touch points that start before and after your existing touch points. Here’s why: Great innovations can happen by looking beyond what you think is your line of work. How can you add value before your client comes on board, and how can you continue to deliver value after your client has done business with you?

Step 3: IMPROVE by fixing it
Fix it. Here’s why: Applying constructive words to touch points can prompt great ideas. Use constructive words like: Stop, Start, Combine, Strengthen, Reduce, Multiply, Substitute, Reverse, Simplify, Speed up, Slow down, and Modify. Could we simplify the sign up process we have? Could we reduce the amount of paper work required both for the client and ourselves?

Step 4: CHALLENGE by asking ‘can we remove it’?
Challenge it. Here’s why: A touch point or part of a product is never beyond challenge, but because we use them so often we see them permanently set in stone. What would happen if you had to remove a touch point? What if we had no face to face meetings? What if we had no forms to fill out?

Step 5: FIGHT by breaking traditional thinking
Fight it.  Here’s why: We are creatures of habit, and left to our own devices we will think and behave the same way every day. Fighting this pattern can help us to create new ideas that we would not normally have considered before. What’s the opposite to what we would normally do? If you work in finance – think romance. If you work in aviation think education and if you work in mining think advertising.

Step 6: BORROW and change them
Change it. Here’s why: Once you have established the key attributes that make an idea great all you need to do is change it to suit your application. What is it that makes Facebook so compelling? How could we take those attributes (not necessarily the technology platform) and apply them to our community of clients and customers.

Step 7: LET GO to create  
Leave it. Here’s why: One of our most creative states is when we are in an Alpha brain wave state. The Alpha brain wave state is seldom achieved when working at our desk, it happens when we are chilled out, calm, relaxing and having fun somewhere away from the office. Make sure you either call yourself on your phone or write your ideas down. The mind is a weak slave to good ideas.

Step 8: USE IT or lose it
Create a mental map. Here’s why: Our mind has so many thoughts that unless we map them, they take up valuable processing space that can stop us from moving on with making our ideas happen. Try using Freemind, Mindmeister or any other mind-mapping software to help capture your thoughts. The mind seldom thinks linearly so why take notes that way?

Step 8: VISUALISE in order to realise
See it first. Here’s why: Actively visualising our finished process, service or product can only help to create a superior one. Imagine what your product, service or process will look like and how will it function? If we can’t see it in our minds eye it’s going to be terribly hard to realise in real time.

Step 9: CONTRACT to get traction
Create a contract. Here’s why: Accountability gets results and by having an accountability partner who asks you how your idea is coming along will force you into action. Find an accountability partner and share with them what you’re going to do and by when. Nothing beats a kick up the back side by a friend to help us complete our projects.

Step 10: MAXIMISE return on investment
Track it. Here’s why: By knowing how our idea is progressing and the effort that has been involved we can objectively establish how much money and resources have been used and the R.O.I from the activity.
Create a spreadsheet that gives your idea a number, tracks the time, energy and resources spent. Look at the time spent, the effort spent and the outcomes of all your hard work. The more you track the more you learn.

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2012/11/1/10-simple-steps-to-innovating.html

Innovation doesn’t always have to be about creating a huge ground breaking revolutionary idea. Innovation can happen with just a small improvement.

I have a number of clients that I work with on process improvement. Process improvement to me is a form of innovation. One of the key elements to any innovation around a process is to know what you do so that you can do it better.

Part of knowing what you do is knowing what other people are doing as well. One of the tools I use with many clients who are working on complex projects is to help them create a RASCI table.

While a tool such as a table may not sound that exciting or innovative, for me if a tool can make things simpler, faster and more effective then it’s a valuable tool. As an owner of a graphic facilitation business I’m biased when it comes to the use of pictures to help communicate ideas. Graphic communication starts with the most basic of tools – elements such as bullet points and tables are graphic ways of organising content in a way so that we can understand it faster and more easily. And the RASCI table is a good example of how a table or a chart can help you in your world.


So lets unpack the RASCI model.
You have a complex project with a number of tasks that need to be done. That’s where the RASCI comes in.

1. Identify what the key tasks will be.
2. Identify who the key people are going to be:

  • who’s going to be responsible for getting the work done?
  • who’s going to be the person to approve the work that is done?
  • who’s going to support the key responsibility in completing the work?
  • who will you need to consult with and get advice from?
  • who will you need to inform about the work that is done during the tasks?


Why not create a RASCI table today to see how it can help you on your complex projects.

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2012/9/19/process-improvement-leads-to-innovation.html

I had a big week last week. A number of keynotes but the big one was spending three days with over 120 switched on women in business. I was a keynote speaker for the Women in Focus conference that was put on by a major bank. There were some major hitters amongst this group, with a diverse crowd of entrepreneurs ranging from a woman who had successfully taken two of her companies public on the NASDAQ, to the owner of Australia’s most successful Prawn farming operation.

I delivered an innovation keynote and workshop to much hooray from the audience (one attendee mentioned that one of the innovation processes had wiped four months off her sales cycle). Later that evening at a lavish dinner they were having, I had the good fortune of sitting down at the table with some seriously innovative ‘start ups’.

The conversation with one woman strayed to the innovation skills that we had covered in our session, and she asked the question “if you could really use a technique to start and idea totally from scratch?”. She was adamant that her business idea (of which she’d just come back from Silicon Valley with $8 million in venture capital funding for) wasn’t something that could be created using a technique.

This is when things get interesting for me, I love it when I find ‘naturally innovative’ people and show them that what they do can be replicated. As we only had a small amount of time to workshop in our session earlier that day, I didn’t get time to mention that what naturally innovative people do to create ideas from scratch is to change their level of thinking.

I only realised this a few years back when a client I was working with questioned the ‘creative leaps’ I was making. It wasn’t until I couldn’t adequately explain the ‘how’, that I realised I needed to find out how I was making those leaps.

Gregory Bateson, anthropologist, linguist and author of Steps to an Ecology of Mind, was a pioneer in abductive thinking, which is the discovery of rules or patterns of an idea in one context and then applying those successfully in a different context. Abductive thinking taps into the patterning system of the mind, which allows us to classify information, objects and ideas.

The different levels of classification we use for thinking are known as the ‘logical levels’. If the context of a subject we think about is rather abstract and generalised, such as ‘furniture’, it means the thinking tends to be at a higher logical level. The more specific our thinking about something (e.g. an armchair) the lower the logical level. Not originally intended as a creative thinking device, the ‘logical levels’ are essentially our brain’s way of grouping and sorting thoughts, words and ideas so they make sense – to others as well as ourselves.

When we are stuck for fresh ideas we have often limited our thinking to one logical level of thinking and therefore one level of ideas. For example, if we were trying to design a new kind of telephone and only applied a constructive thinking approach we would more than likely be very constricted in what we could come up with. By looking for variations and modifications and including portability, size, shape, hands-free options we may end up with some worthwhile yet not necessarily brilliant or outstanding ideas. Our idea generation is stuck on one logical level, and this excludes us from many of the other options possible.

By expanding and moving between the levels of thinking, however, we can change the source of our ideas and increase the number of new, fresh, creative combinations. As Bateson discovered, abductive thinking has the potential to generate fresh perspectives, ideas and solutions. One way to ‘change it’ is to discover the context of the object you are looking at and then apply it in another area by moving upwards and then sideways on the lower level. So how can you use the logical levels to become more creative, especially when you don’t want to waste time classifying everything? Remember the telephone? We want to come up with some ideas for a new, better telephone. Unless we can change our level of thinking we’re limiting our ideas.

Becoming familiar with the library
One way of thinking about this is to imagine you are organising your creative thoughts like books on a shelf in a library. The shelves in this library are different to an ordinary library, however. The library shelves are a way of classifying information: the higher the logical level the more abstract and theoretical the information becomes so the books on philosophy, politics and theories of design, for example, would be placed up here. The shelf directly above the telephone shelf is at a higher logical level. The lower the shelf the more concrete the content of the books, and the cookbooks and DIY home handyman books would be found down here. While the higher shelves contain books on non-tangible and abstract concepts and topics, the lower shelves contain books describing physical and material objects.

So the shelf we are looking at is the shelf of telephones. Now looking at this shelf is still rather abstract as there are many different phones, which are defined on the level below: mobile phones, satellite phones, phones with cords, cordless phones, etc. Our thinking on this logical level is limited by the books on these ideas for phones, so we probably will only come up with ideas or variations of phones that have already been done.

The telephone books on the shelf below describe the models that exist in physical and material form, i.e. Nokia 6322, Sony cordless home phone, etc. To create ideas for a new phone we ask ourselves one of the following questions: What’s the principle or philosophy behind it?’ or ‘What category/group does this phone belong to on the level above?’ The answer to this question is ‘communication device’ or even ‘system’. Let’s just check in for a moment. Notice how ‘communication device or system’ is more abstract and theoretical than ‘phone’; it is also more inclusive as there are many more choices available and possible.

So let’s stick with ‘communication device or system’. Now that we are on a higher logical level we have fewer limitations and more freedom in our thinking and ideas generation. Obviously a communication device or system is not what we were looking for but we can use this higher logical level as a source of inspiration and then use this inspiration back down on the lower logical level. In fact, when we use the higher logical level for inspiration we find we will not end up at the same limited shelf section as before on the level below. We will have shifted to the shelf at the side as well. So all of a sudden we may find ourselves in the fax or email book section.

Before we move back down, we need to ask ourselves: ‘What do we want the device or system for? What do we want it to do? How do we want it work?’ and, most importantly, ‘How else can we achieve this?’ On our communication system shelf the answers might include: communicating face to face, using sign language, using body language, signalling using flags, using music, touch, smell and Morse code. All of these are communication systems that we can now use to provide us with some new combination sources to create some fresh ideas for a new phone.

To come back down to a lower shelf and lower logical level we ask ourselves questions such as, ‘How does this exist?’ or ‘What is a physical representation/ form of this?’ We can now start to apply parts of the higher logical level to our telephone. Some ideas that start to flow may include:

• a mobile phone screen that flashes a certain colour to signal the importance of the call, e.g. red for emergency, blue for important, green for conversation (an idea taken from the signalling system using coloured flags)
• a phone that emits a chemical fragrance to reflect the content of a message, e.g. the smell of roses for romance, the smell of freshly printed money for business
• a phone that vibrates a certain way depending on who’s calling (Morse code).

The magic of the logical levels is that you can use them to help free your mind from the limitations of looking for a solution around what’s been done before. By moving up logical levels the thinking becomes more abstract and we become more free thinking.

For the start up founder, her idea (which I can’t go into detail on) didn’t start by focusing on a widget, it came from her naturally thinking on a higher level, of how could she allow people the ability to do more things themselves on their computer, wouldn’t it be great if she could give people the freedom and technical capability to do something that was ordinarily too complex for anyone but an expert to execute on…she had gone up a level of thinking without even knowing she was doing it.

And yes she conceded and came to the realisation that her thinking style mimicked that style of abstraction, and could be learnt as a skill and applied consistently for commercial gain.

If a world class entrepreneur believes that this is a skill that anyone could apply then you can to, because you are a world class innovator.

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2012/8/30/abductive-thinking-creates-innovation.html

Crowd contribution is a sure fire way of creating innovation.

So you’ve hit the wall with your innovation. You’ve come up with a stack of ideas over the years but you just can’t seem to find any new ways to make money out of them.

Well you can, you could try applying some innovation techniques to them like combination, attribution and any other of the 42 innovate skills I talk about. Or you might just use the innovation skill called ‘crowd contribution’.

Sometimes we simply don’t have the time or headspace to apply a 4 or 5 light bulb (high level of difficulty) innovation skill to find new ideas. ‘Crowd contribution’ is a one light bulb (simple) activity that can accelerate your innovations.

You may have heard of organisations asking their customers for ideas for what they want in their products. An even more powerful technique is to ask them what they could do with parts of their business – be it a product, process or part of their service in a completely new way or new industry.

It’s all about tapping into genius of the masses and providing them worth a reward to do so. The thinking behind this is that there are often more people with more time and less boundaries that are willing to think outside of those boxes to create new combinations, ideas and innovative ideas.

Essential elements for this technique are:
Know what you are willing to share of what it is that you do already.
Have a financial or recognition reward that is in line with the potential millions that your organisation may reap.
Encourage ideas for totally new applications and totally new industries.

While this is an ‘open innovation’ trend that is starting to happen in research institutions it’s something that could just as easily happen in the private sector. A very good example of this ‘crowd contribution’ innovation that is about to be put into practice is marblar.com. Scientists post their discoveries, the crowd checks them out and shares all kinds of ways to use their discoveries and you get rewards for your efforts.

What ways can you start to tap into the minds of the world?

Cheers
Nils

Nils Vesk
Innovation Architect
Innovation Speaker
Design Thinker

 

Article source via:  http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/2012/8/20/crowd-contribution-for-innovation.html

I caught up with an old design colleague of mine the other day and we had fun sharing a few trips down memory lane. Our topic of conversation turned to the ‘creative type’ of people who used to hang around the cafes near our design studio. The ‘creative types’ ranged from marketing & advertising types to your graphic & visual artists.

One of our favourite past times was to try and spot the ‘creatives’ from the advertising agency and try and work out their job. Were they a copywriter, a graphic designer or a marketer?  An observation we made was that the ‘über creative’ types would go to an extreme effort to try to look creative.

I’ll never forget there was one creative who we established was the head creative of a major advertising agency. He had a penchant for feral mohawks, bad fitting clothes and wait for it fluorescent socks of different colours on each foot.

As the years rolled by I found that people in ‘creative roles’ seemed to spend more energy on looking creative rather than being innovative. While creative thinking can help lead to innovation, more often than not, left alone it becomes a distraction and pointless disruption. Innovation is primarily about creating great ideas and taking them to market for commercial gain.

If you don’t look creative and don’t have a creative job, chances are you’re already innovative. Some of the most extraordinary innovative inventions, products and ideas come from the most ordinary people, and by that I mean those of us who are deemed ‘creative’. One of the most iconic brand logos of all time the Coca-Cola logo wasn’t designed by a creative designer, it was designed by the bookkeeper Frank Robinson. If a bookkeeper can design a world famous logo design, then you too can apply your innovation.

You are innovative!

Nils Vesk
Innovation Architect

 

Article source via: http://www.innovationblueprint.com.au/innovation-blog/?currentPage=3